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Animal Science: Today and Tomorrow

May 27, 2014

Dr. Tom Troxel                                                                                Dr. Michael L. Looper

 

Spring Commencement a Big Moment for Students

 

On May 10, the University of Arkansas conferred degrees to those students at the spring commencement ceremony. The Department of Animal Science proudly boasted a First Ranked Senior Scholar, a Senior Scholar and two Distinguished Graduates.

Named as one of two First Ranked Senior Scholars, Jessie Hargis graduated with a 4.0 GPA after completing all of her coursework at the University of Arkansas. The daughter of Billy and Kristen Hargis of Fayetteville, Jessie was a regular on the Chancellor’s list and was a four-year recipient of the Chancellor’s scholarship. She plans to attend the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine in the fall.

Claire Crews earned the distinction of being one of three Senior Scholars. The Senior Scholar awards are given to those students who have a 4.0 GPA with at least half of their coursework completed at the U of A. The daughter of Vickie Salsbury and Claiborne Crews, she was a member of the Razorback Marching Band; president of the Pre-Vet Club; and studied abroad in Belize providing free veterinary services to animals owned by low-income families. Claire will be attending Veterinary School at the University of Missouri in the fall of 2014. Claire also was a Bumpers College Honors Program Distinguished Graduate.

Rachel Cummins was a Bumpers College Honors Program Distinguished Graduate. She is the daughter of Hal and Patti Cummins; she wrote her honors thesis on the “Palatability of Teff Grass in Horses”.  She will be attending Veterinary School at the University of Missouri in the fall of 2014.

In addition, the Department presented a Doctor of Philosophy to Michelle Thomas. Five Master of Science degrees were presented to: Mohan Acharya, Elizabeth Backes, Jace Hollenback, Brandon Smith and Ashley Nicole Young.

The Department also conferred 45 Bachelor of Science degrees. Congratulations to all of our graduates!

 

2012 Census of Agriculture is Released

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) conducted the 2012 Census of Agriculture, analyzed the data, and prepared a report you can download. You can find the report at www.agcensus.usda.gov/. The report is 34,925 KB so it’s contains a lot of information. The census provides a comprehensive picture of American agriculture in 2012, and NASS recognizes and appreciates that many individuals and organizations contributed to the effort.

Most importantly, the success of the agriculture census depends directly on the cooperation of farmers and ranchers across the country. Recognizing that participating in the census is their responsibility and gives them a voice in their future, agricultural producers took the time to provide the information requested. NASS is grateful to every producer who participated in the 2012 Census of Agriculture.

Also essential were the many partners who communicated about the census and encouraged producers to respond. Farm organizations, stakeholder groups, agricultural media, community-based organizations, and land grant and other universities helped to build awareness of the census and its importance to producers, their communities, and U.S. agriculture as a whole. NASS appreciates their help in reaching all kinds of agricultural operations, thereby ensuring a comprehensive census.

 

United States Data

There is a lot of data in the 2012 Census of Agriculture but the data we are going to share with you is the beef cow inventory. In the US there were 727,906 farms with beef cows (2012) which were a 4.8% decline compared to the number of farms with beef cows in 2007. The beef farms in 2012 contained 28,956,553 head of beef cows which means the average herd size in the US was 40 head of beef cows.

The number of US farms with 1 to 49 head of beef cows was 81% and but only controlled 29% of the beef cows. The number of US farms with 50 to 99 head of beef cows was 10% and they controlled 16% of the beef cows. In addition, the number of US farms with 100 to 199 head of beef cows was 5% and they controlled 17% of the beef cows. The largest beef herds (200 head or more) only consisted of 3.8% of the US beef farms and but they controlled over a third (36%) of the beef cows.

 

Arkansas Data

In Arkansas there were 23,385 farms with beef cows (2012) which were a 7.4% decline compared to the number of farms with beef cows in 2007. The beef farms in 2012 contained 813,250 head of beef cows which means the average herd size in the Arkansas was 35 head of beef cows. The January 1, 2014 census listed Arkansas with having 882,000 beef cows so cow numbers have increased by 68,750 head since 2012. With the 2012 drought it is hard to say how many beef cattle farms are in the state in 2014. Many would speculate the number of farms have declined since 2012.

The number of Arkansas farms with 1 to 49 head of beef cows was 81% and controlled 40% of the beef cows. The number of AR farms with 50 to 99 head of beef cows was 12% and they controlled 23% of the beef cows. In addition, the number of AR farms with 100 to 199 head of beef cows was 5% and they controlled 18% of the beef cows. The largest beef herds (200 head or more) only consisted of 2% of the AR beef farms but they controlled a fifth (20%) of the beef cows.

 

 

For more information about cattle production, visit www.uaex.edu or www.arkansas-livestock.com or contact your county extension office.

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